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DBL%20Hendrix%20small.png College chemistry, 1983

Derek Lowe The 2002 Model

Dbl%20new%20portrait%20B%26W.png After 10 years of blogging. . .

Derek Lowe, an Arkansan by birth, got his BA from Hendrix College and his PhD in organic chemistry from Duke before spending time in Germany on a Humboldt Fellowship on his post-doc. He's worked for several major pharmaceutical companies since 1989 on drug discovery projects against schizophrenia, Alzheimer's, diabetes, osteoporosis and other diseases. To contact Derek email him directly: derekb.lowe@gmail.com Twitter: Dereklowe

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In the Pipeline: Don't miss Derek Lowe's excellent commentary on drug discovery and the pharma industry in general at In the Pipeline

In the Pipeline

« Where the Talent Comes From | Main | Perhaps Not Quite Technically Legal, Come to Think of It »

May 20, 2014

Xenon's Use as a Sports Drug Is Banned

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Posted by Derek

Just a couple of months ago, I wrote about how xenon has been used as a performance-enhancing drug. Well, now it's banned. But I'd guess that they're going to have to look for its downstream effects, because detecting xenon itself, particularly a good while after exposure, is going to be a tall order. . .

Comments (13) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: Analytical Chemistry


COMMENTS

1. jhb on May 20, 2014 12:23 PM writes...

Assuming the beneficial effects of Xe/Ar come from inducing mild hypoxia, the results can probably be obtained by living/training at high altitudes or sleeping in a simulated altitude tent (which dilutes the air slightly with N2).

Derek, if you are ever short of topics to blog about, a med chemists perspective of the science behind sports doping would be very interesting to read.

Permalink to Comment

2. jhb on May 20, 2014 12:25 PM writes...

Assuming the beneficial effects of Xe/Ar come from inducing mild hypoxia, the results can probably be obtained by living/training at high altitudes or sleeping in a simulated altitude tent (which dilutes the air slightly with N2).

Derek, if you are ever short of topics to blog about, a med chemists perspective of the science behind sports doping would be very interesting to read.

Permalink to Comment

3. John Spevacek on May 20, 2014 12:52 PM writes...

Come on! Everyone knows you just have to analyze for the metabolites.

/sarcasm off

Permalink to Comment

4. AlmostPhD on May 20, 2014 1:19 PM writes...

I remember a CSI (or similar show) episode where they were able to find trace liquid nitrogen in a coffee mug days later, so detecting Xenon shouldn't be a problem...

Permalink to Comment

5. Bill W on May 20, 2014 2:35 PM writes...

With the implementation of the Biological Passport, the anti-doping authorities no longer have to detect an illegal substance, only the downstream effects, e.g. size distribution of reticulocytes. Before the Biological Passport, detecting things like hGH and EPO were ostensibly an IQ test, with a detection window of just a couple of days.

We'll never have clean sport, but the biological passport mitigates the extent to which athletes can cheat greatly.

Permalink to Comment

6. newnickname on May 20, 2014 5:06 PM writes...

Wasn't there some famous athlete with an abnormally high testosterone level and they banned him for doping? He was able to prove with medical records that his testosterone had been high his entire adult life and got the ban lifted? Or maybe he had to agree to a monitored stay in a clinic or hospital to prove he wasn't doping to get those high levels?

Permalink to Comment

7. Teddy Z on May 20, 2014 6:05 PM writes...

Hyperpolarize their blood and observe enhanced NMR signals. Maybe even of other crap they are using!

Permalink to Comment

8. oldnuke on May 20, 2014 7:07 PM writes...

@3 We're waiting for the first athlete to try inhaling fluorine ....

As Richard Pryor once said "Fire is inspirational, they should use it in the Olympics. People get out of your way when you're on fire." gr

Permalink to Comment

9. Anonymous on May 20, 2014 7:56 PM writes...

@6 Santiago Botero, if you're thinking of a cyclist. Not sure what the evidence was though.

Permalink to Comment

10. Anonymous on May 21, 2014 3:10 AM writes...

@6: Good chat-up line: "Yeah, I was a professional athlete but they banned me because my testosterone levels were too high. Wanna come back to my place?"

Permalink to Comment

11. anony-mous on May 21, 2014 5:36 AM writes...

@10
Funny.....but no thanks !

Permalink to Comment

12. Red Fiona on May 21, 2014 7:23 AM writes...

Re: Santiago Botero, I thought his were abnormally high haemocrit levels.

Permalink to Comment

13. simpl on May 21, 2014 7:42 AM writes...

Endurance sports, like cross-country skiing, have been blocking athletes with high red blood cell counts from competing, using a safety argument that they are at risk of blood clotting.

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