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DBL%20Hendrix%20small.png College chemistry, 1983

Derek Lowe The 2002 Model

Dbl%20new%20portrait%20B%26W.png After 10 years of blogging. . .

Derek Lowe, an Arkansan by birth, got his BA from Hendrix College and his PhD in organic chemistry from Duke before spending time in Germany on a Humboldt Fellowship on his post-doc. He's worked for several major pharmaceutical companies since 1989 on drug discovery projects against schizophrenia, Alzheimer's, diabetes, osteoporosis and other diseases. To contact Derek email him directly: derekb.lowe@gmail.com Twitter: Dereklowe

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In the Pipeline

« Pick Your Stench | Main | Eating A Whole Bunch of Random Compounds »

January 23, 2013

Coincidence, No Doubt. Well, Some Doubt.

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Posted by Derek

Has anyone happened to read this paper, from 2009, or this one, from this year? Well, Shawn Burdette of WPI has, and he noticed that (to a significant extent) they're the same paper. Prof. Valerie Pierre of Minnesota, author of the first paper, is reportedly not too amused, and I don't blame her. But hey, the 2013 authors did at least cite her paper. . .in reference 14d. So at least there's that.

Update: but wait, there's more!

Comments (12) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: The Dark Side | The Scientific Literature


COMMENTS

1. Ricky Connolly on January 23, 2013 10:38 AM writes...

Poppycock! The abstract figure has been rotated 180 degrees; totally original work by our friends at Beishida!

Permalink to Comment

2. Tom Lehrer on January 23, 2013 11:08 AM writes...

I am never forget the day I first meet the great Lobachevsky.
In one word he told me secret of success in mathematics:
Plagiarize!

Plagiarize,
Let no one else's work evade your eyes,
Remember why the good Lord made your eyes,
So don't shade your eyes,
But plagiarize, plagiarize, plagiarize -
Only be sure always to call it please 'research'.

Permalink to Comment

3. nitrosonium on January 23, 2013 11:27 AM writes...

apologies for not following all the twitter feeds back through the history of this and right back to the source but I have few questions:
1) was see-ArOh the 1st to catch this? if so (or not) how was this caught? if by coincidence, how can this be expected to be caught in every case? or is that last one just not possible??

Permalink to Comment

4. Chemjobber on January 23, 2013 11:37 AM writes...

3: It sounds like Professor Pierre was informed of it somehow, and passed it along to Professor Burdette. It was Prof. Burdette who informed the rest of the world via Twitter. SAO was first to post with a conclusion.

Permalink to Comment

5. Anonymous on January 23, 2013 12:57 PM writes...

Yan Xi worked in Chuan He's lab from ~2007-2009. I am not surprised that he plagiarizes.

Permalink to Comment

6. Anonymous on January 23, 2013 1:25 PM writes...

@ 5. (Anon) - Why are you not surprised that he plagiarized Prof. He's work? I don't quite understand your point. Are you suggesting that all who previously worked in Prof Chuan He's lab go on to do this, or are you suggesting that this is encouraged in Prof. He's lab? Maybe you could elaborate further?

Permalink to Comment

7. The Iron Chemist on January 23, 2013 1:49 PM writes...

@5: I'd have to echo the sentiments of #6. I personally have nothing but respect for He and his work. Could you clarify whether or not your comment based on personal knowledge of Yan?

Permalink to Comment

8. dearieme on January 23, 2013 5:24 PM writes...

What sort of muttonhead would plagiarise from JACS? Surely you should pick on something from an obscure foreign language journal and bury it in a different obscure foreign language journal?

Permalink to Comment

9. dearieme on January 23, 2013 5:25 PM writes...

What sort of muttonhead would plagiarise from JACS? Surely you should pick on something from an obscure foreign language journal and bury it in a different obscure foreign language journal?

Permalink to Comment

10. chacao on January 23, 2013 6:25 PM writes...

#8: If you will plagiarize, might as well plagiarize a good article. Or do you want people to believe that your group does crappy science?

Permalink to Comment

11. dearieme on January 24, 2013 6:16 AM writes...

But you'll get caught, #10, sure as eggs is eggs.

Permalink to Comment

12. XY on January 24, 2013 8:04 AM writes...

#8: If you will plagiarize, might as well plagiarize a good article. Or do you want people to believe that your group does crappy science?

Permalink to Comment

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