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DBL%20Hendrix%20small.png College chemistry, 1983

Derek Lowe The 2002 Model

Dbl%20new%20portrait%20B%26W.png After 10 years of blogging. . .

Derek Lowe, an Arkansan by birth, got his BA from Hendrix College and his PhD in organic chemistry from Duke before spending time in Germany on a Humboldt Fellowship on his post-doc. He's worked for several major pharmaceutical companies since 1989 on drug discovery projects against schizophrenia, Alzheimer's, diabetes, osteoporosis and other diseases. To contact Derek email him directly: derekb.lowe@gmail.com Twitter: Dereklowe

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In the Pipeline: Don't miss Derek Lowe's excellent commentary on drug discovery and the pharma industry in general at In the Pipeline

In the Pipeline

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January 9, 2012

The JP Morgan Myths

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Posted by Derek

The JP Morgan Healthcare Conference is underway this week out in San Francisco, so there are a lot of biotech/pharma headlines to come out of that. Luke Timmerman over at Xconomy has "Five Myths" to come out of the conference. Unfortunately, two of them are that biotech IPOs are picking up, and that the general mood is upbeat. . .

Comments (7) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: Business and Markets


COMMENTS

1. Reese on January 9, 2012 3:53 PM writes...

Anything JP Morgan Chase says is suspect. As a consumer bank they should be renamed 'Satan inc.'

How anyone could have an account at that bank is beyond me. If you haven't had any problems with them, don't worry your day will come.

As a stock picker I can say I've used their analysts calls as a contra-indicator. I'm sure their conference is just 'talking their book'.

Beware Chase!

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2. Student on January 9, 2012 6:02 PM writes...

Is there a place to read about the talks?

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3. pete on January 9, 2012 6:42 PM writes...

@3 Student -- you can follow Tweets from Luke Timmerman (link above), or I'm guessing (?) Adam Feuerstein will be covering -- find him at TheStreet.

Not sure anyone's broadcasting slide decks +/- audio for the talks. They used to, when previous owners hosted this conference, and it was really informative. Times have changed and apparently JP Morgan doesn't want to let in the riff-raff.

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4. SMILES on January 10, 2012 1:09 AM writes...

FYI, here is the official JPMorgan Conf. info online with webcasts: http://jpmorgan.metameetings.com/confbook/healthcare12/home.php

You will be able to tune into the webcast company presentations live or on demand after the presentation (subject to company consent). You do not need a username and password but you will be prompted for your email address. The not-for-profit track & private companies may not be webcast.

It is a good place to meet old or new friends in biotech and pharma around the wrold, esp. CEOs/CFOs or biz dev guys. It is once-a-year go-to place for biotech/pharma.

Enjoy!

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5. johnnyboy on January 10, 2012 11:22 AM writes...

@2: Adam Feuerstein does cover the JP Morgan conference, and also does a live blog of some of the talks. It's not always informative, but at least it's usually entertaining.
http://www.thestreet.com/headlines-and-perspectives/biotech/index.html

Permalink to Comment

6. pete on January 10, 2012 1:55 PM writes...

@4 Thanks - I stand corrected

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7. weirdo on January 12, 2012 1:17 PM writes...

I think the biggest JPMorgan myth (amongst scientists) is that the presentations are the thing. They're, maybe, 5% of what goes on.

It's the networking. The, literally, thousands of 10-minute conversations at Starbuck's, the Sir Francis Drake lobby, the back-room at the Westin, the big hospitality suite filled with booze, where deals are dicussed. Most people who go to "JPMorgan" don't even register for the "meeting" (so can't even get into the Westin St. Francis). They are PDA'ing like mad trying to find the VC guy across the mezzanine, and then fighting for a chair in the lobby.

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