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DBL%20Hendrix%20small.png College chemistry, 1983

Derek Lowe The 2002 Model

Dbl%20new%20portrait%20B%26W.png After 10 years of blogging. . .

Derek Lowe, an Arkansan by birth, got his BA from Hendrix College and his PhD in organic chemistry from Duke before spending time in Germany on a Humboldt Fellowship on his post-doc. He's worked for several major pharmaceutical companies since 1989 on drug discovery projects against schizophrenia, Alzheimer's, diabetes, osteoporosis and other diseases. To contact Derek email him directly: derekb.lowe@gmail.com Twitter: Dereklowe

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November 2, 2011

Sanofi Announces Layoffs

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Posted by Derek

Sanofi seems to have told employees this morning that layoffs are on the way. These will be in both the sales and the R&D organizations, and will be part of some rearranging of the later between the Boston/Cambridge and New Jersey sites. Details aren't very clear at the moment; anyone with more info is welcome to add it to the comments. . .

Comments (50) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: Business and Markets


COMMENTS

1. CMCguy on November 2, 2011 1:07 PM writes...

I was laid off earlier in the year from sanofi. I heard from a colleague that the site in Bridgewater will be closed end of 2012. He said a separate announcement will be made about lay off details.

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2. Todd on November 2, 2011 1:10 PM writes...

This jibes with what I've heard. I was invited to an interview a month ago to have it cancelled due to the company deciding to drop a hiring freeze. I presume this is of a piece with this news.

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3. @Derek on November 2, 2011 1:32 PM writes...

You mean "Boston", right? Though it would be cool if S-A had research efforts in particle physics!

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4. Anonymous on November 2, 2011 1:55 PM writes...

Subatomic particles for MS!

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5. Chemjobber on November 2, 2011 2:30 PM writes...

CMCguy: I'm sorry to hear that -- I hope things are going well.

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6. Anonymous on November 2, 2011 2:54 PM writes...

Another layoff in NJ??? Damn...the big pharma's are destroying the industry, particularly in NJ.

I read the Bridgewater site is to be closed. Watch out Roche, Nutley...you're next! The writing is on the wall over there!

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7. Former Sanofi on November 2, 2011 3:03 PM writes...

I was at Bridgewater last year in September when they announced the layoffs. After that they had two more during which my former group essentially lost half of its members. During each layoff they promised us that "this time will be the last time". It would be far better if they at least told us about future layoffs so that we can prepare ourselves financially and mentally. But of course that kind of decent behavior would be completely unbecoming of Big Pharma, wouldn't it?

Good luck to everyone.

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8. CR on November 2, 2011 3:06 PM writes...

http://www.longislandpress.com/2011/11/02/sanofi-reorganizing-research-trimming-sales-force/

To Former Sanofi: Sorry to hear about the experience, many of us have gone through similar situations. But, you almost have to be prepared mentally and financially any more, don't you? Even if the management doesn't say that more layoffs are coming - don't we all know they are? Whether it be in 6-months, a year...we all know they are coming.

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9. PharmaHeretic on November 2, 2011 3:49 PM writes...

Why are people surprised and disappointed when sociopaths act like their real selves? Did you seriously believe that these slick mercenaries have the best interest of any organization in mind?

They don't care about anything beyond their next round of bonuses. If anything- they likely find the destruction of your professional lives amusing.

You cannot treat a cancer by petitioning it to stop or pointing out that destroying its host also imperils its own survival. Those malignant cells don't think or care.

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10. startup on November 2, 2011 5:16 PM writes...

Chris Christie is on the radio all the time here, plugging NJ as a place to move business to. He says unemployment rate drops there. Oh, who to believe?

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11. anonyMouse on November 2, 2011 6:31 PM writes...

The Sanofi research site in NJ is to be closed. All US research, with the exception of the Tucson site, is to be in the Boston area from mid-2012 forward. 20-30% of scientists will be offered jobs in Massachusetts. Development (with the exception of Genzyme and Sanofi Pasteur development) will be located in NJ.

Elias Zernhouni didn't say that the site was to be closed--that would have made too nice a quote. The site closure was announced after Zerhouni left the podium, but in the same meeting.

Major layoffs will occur in Germany, as well. The Budapest and Milan sites are rumored to be closed. No cutbacks announced in France, but these are said to be postponed until after the French elections.

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12. Anonymous on November 2, 2011 6:31 PM writes...

Let me guess...the ones at Sanofi that will be let go are the experienced and knowledgeable ones with >10 yrs. experience and a track record. The ones kept will be the "greenies" with

Do you think "greenies" are your future??? Really? Truly? No, I mean really?? No wonder big pharma (aka big BS) is collapsing.

We are all witnessing the collapse of big pharma...and the rise of outsourcing!

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13. anonyMouse on November 2, 2011 6:32 PM writes...

The Sanofi research site in NJ is to be closed. All US research, with the exception of the Tucson site, is to be in the Boston area from mid-2012 forward. 20-30% of scientists will be offered jobs in Massachusetts. Development (with the exception of Genzyme and Sanofi Pasteur development) will be located in NJ.

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14. Anonymous on November 2, 2011 6:33 PM writes...

Let me guess...the ones at Sanofi that will be let go are the experienced and knowledgeable ones with >10 yrs. experience and a track record. The ones kept will be the "greenies" with no track record.

Do you think "greenies" are your future??? Really? Truly? No, I mean really?? No wonder big pharma (aka big BS) is collapsing.

We are all witnessing the collapse of big pharma...and the rise of outsourcing!

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15. anonyMouse on November 2, 2011 6:45 PM writes...

Zerhouni is clearly looking to shake up the "old Europe" research culture of Sanofi. Unfortunately, he's keeping much of the management that fostered that culture and will lay off the scientists who would gladly adapt to more forward-thinking, agile managerial practices. Should be interesting to see how some of the scientific department heads are treated by the Genzyme scientists who are placed under them.

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16. anonyMouse on November 2, 2011 6:46 PM writes...

Zerhouni is clearly looking to shake up the "old Europe" research culture of Sanofi. Unfortunately, he's keeping much of the management that fostered that culture and will lay off the scientists who would gladly adapt to more forward-thinking, agile managerial practices. Should be interesting to see how some of the scientific department heads are treated by the Genzyme scientists who are placed under them.

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17. Student on November 2, 2011 8:47 PM writes...

I've been in school studying chemistry for almost 10 years now (BSci + OChem PhD) and each year the industry news has become more dire. As students we are told to pipe down, work hard and not worry about it. There really is not much else to do, however it is hard to ignore this anymore. Professors don't even mention the problems out there nor are they really available to talk about it. If you don't get a position, it's your own fault from what I understand.

Is there a term for when someone's career is over before it even starts? "Stillbirth" career? I'm feeling that to continue is just absurd with so many layoffs occurring constantly.

"If I would be a young man again and had to decide how to make my living, I would not try to become a scientist or scholar or teacher. I would rather
choose to be a plumber or a peddler in the hope to find that modest degree of independence still available under present circumstances." -- Albert Einstein, The Reporter, November 18 1954

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18. My 0.02 on November 2, 2011 10:38 PM writes...

@Derek and #17,

Derek, one of these days, perhaps you can start a thread which discuss current status of graduate education at chem departments around the country. Let grad students and postdocs share their stories.

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19. Anonymous on November 2, 2011 10:40 PM writes...

What ultimately happens to all these big pharma chemists?

I am assuming there aren't enough teaching jobs out there to even make dent in the numbers being thrown out onto the street every other week.

Are there really enough openings in the biotech Mecca also known as Boston to absorb the bulk of the displaced pharma refugees?

Do the bottom feeders at Kelly Scientific, Covance and Aerotek, with their endless lists of "major pharma" clients in "undisclosed locations" with "immediate openings" ever pick up any of these refugees?

Is Linkedin really of any use given the steady stream of layoff casualties we are witnessing over and over, month after month, year after year? Are there any laid off synthetic/medicinal chemists here willing to say that they found a new position via their Linkedin network?

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20. MoMo on November 3, 2011 12:25 AM writes...

Boston is filled now with science zombies looking for work instead of brains, as very few nurtured relationships during their stints as high paid automatons for the science machines known as Pharma. In a high cost of living center as Boston their only option is to start synthesizing street drugs.

Then violent crimes against the rich will become more common, increasing the odds some Pharma exec will be robbed and beaten to a pulp.

What goes around comes around.

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21. MoMo on November 3, 2011 12:49 AM writes...

And LinkedIn fans, if you think it will help you find a job get real. It is primarily used by voyeurs, spies or losers.

What category do you fit in?

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22. smurf on November 3, 2011 1:11 AM writes...

LinkedIn is a great tool to stay into contact with colleagues and business partners, and to understand the networks in the industry.

It is often use by freelance recruiters and recruitment firms. So far I got two interviews with the help of LinkedIn, just in the last 12 month.

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23. anonymous on November 3, 2011 1:50 AM writes...

@17: If you can develop a talent, craft, or skill that targets the top 10% of earners you'll do well. Pampered dog trainer, yoga instructor to the stars, financial advisor, fine cabinet maker...that type of thing. The bottom 90% of the people in the US will have no income to spare.

@19 and @20: In the past 40 years the US has become a society of two-income families. And it is common for people to marry within their class/profession/education level. Many of the laid off chemists/biologists still have a scientist or professional spouse who earns enough to keep the family going. The result is an almost bottomless well of excess scientific labor sitting on the sideline, still looking for scientific work, and unable/unwilling to take drastic action (e.g. move, retrain, downsize expectations) due to spouse job/support. True, many laid off scientists have had to give up and move on (to whatever they can get), but the excess labor issue won't change until 1) output of fresh PhDs drops dramatically, and 2) the current bolus of unemployed scientists ages to the point at which they can "retire" or at which they cannot realistically expect to be employed in their fields again. This might be 5-15 years, or maybe longer, as a steady stream of new layoffs keeps the pool filled.

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24. Anonymous on November 3, 2011 4:10 AM writes...

@20. Your post contains a typo.

You said "violent crimes against the **rich**".

I am assuming you meant to say "violent crimes against the **job creators**".

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25. Anonymous on November 3, 2011 4:20 AM writes...

@23

My nominee for industry phrase of the year:

"current bolus of unemployed scientists" Nice!!!!

Can I assume that you would label as bunk the recent Time Magazine article and all articles of this ilk:

The Next Great Resource Shortage: U.S. Scientist

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26. huh??? on November 3, 2011 4:21 AM writes...

@24. Anonymous
You're kidding, right??? How many Fortune 500 CEOs (who, by any measure, are **rich**) are currently **job creators** (at least in the US)? Bet you wouldn't even have to take off your socks to count them all!!!!

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27. non organic chemist on November 3, 2011 4:33 AM writes...

So, my dad is an organic chemist PhD who makes natural products and he's old-ish and getting to retirement age. He didn't get paid a lot in his last job and was in some debt since he bough a house and some cars.

Two years ago, he bought a market store that specializes on products from one part of the world (there is a bit of an immigrant community for that), but also the normals still shop there. After doing a lot of advertising, and improving the store, he's now debt free and making some money. Now he doesn't have to worry about making a living from organic chemistry any more and he's a lot happier (plus he'll have something to do when he retires).

I would suggest buying a small business that has a guaranteed income. Just get out of this industry if you'e been laid off after 20 years. How hard is it to take some classes to retrain as a refrigerator technician?

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28. Mitt on November 3, 2011 4:38 AM writes...

@26. Yes, the Fortune 500 CEOs are **job creators**. The reasons they are collectively sitting on trillions of dollars in cash and not hiring now are:

Their personal income taxes are too high.

Their corporate taxes are too high.

EPA and other government regulations are too burdensome.

Being forced to provide healthcare benefits for potential future employees will cut into their profits.

We live in a global economy.

Corporations and the folks who run them are people too. Stop supporting class warfare points of view and help put America back to work.

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29. Anonymous on November 3, 2011 5:39 AM writes...

I've lost track. Are the CEOs of BMS, GSK and Roche the only remaining big pharma execs who haven't yet returned their RSVP for the Pharma CEO Layoff Soiree?

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30. Anonymous on November 3, 2011 6:02 AM writes...

@27. Wouldn't it be cheaper, faster and more lucrative to just invest in a copy of Rosetta Stone Mandarin or Hindu?

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31. Anonymous on November 3, 2011 6:04 AM writes...

@27. Wouldn't it be cheaper, faster and more lucrative to just invest in a copy of Rosetta Stone Mandarin or Hindu?

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32. Anonymous on November 3, 2011 6:07 AM writes...

@27. Wouldn't it be cheaper, faster and more lucrative to just invest in a copy of Rosetta Stone Mandarin or Hindu?

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33. Anonymous2 on November 3, 2011 6:07 AM writes...

Sickened at the thought of what this company has become. In the past decade it has gone from a small pharma to one of the big giants and during this period of growth has lost site of the people that have led them to this point. Sanofi used to value its employees but have continued to cut cut cut first at employee benefits then to its employees demise in order to keep its stockholders happy! The end to a great era. Welcome to the new company that cares nothing about loyalty and only about $$$$. For those receiving the axe. Consider this as your chance to escape and find a new life--that is if u can manage to stay financially alive while u find your new place in the American workforce!

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34. Anonymous2 on November 3, 2011 6:08 AM writes...

Sickened at the thought of what this company has become. In the past decade it has gone from a small pharma to one of the big giants and during this period of growth has lost site of the people that have led them to this point. Sanofi used to value its employees but have continued to cut cut cut first at employee benefits then to its employees demise in order to keep its stockholders happy! The end to a great era. Welcome to the new company that cares nothing about loyalty and only about $$$$. For those receiving the axe. Consider this as your chance to escape and find a new life--that is if u can manage to stay financially alive while u find your new place in the American workforce!

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35. Anonymous2 on November 3, 2011 6:11 AM writes...

Sickened at the thought of what this company has become. In the past decade it has gone from a small pharma to one of the big giants and during this period of growth has lost site of the people that have led them to this point. Sanofi used to value its employees but have continued to cut cut cut first at employee benefits then to its employees demise in order to keep its stockholders happy! The end to a great era. Welcome to the new company that cares nothing about loyalty and only about $$$$. For those receiving the axe. Consider this as your chance to escape and find a new life--that is if u can manage to stay financially alive while u find your new place in the American workforce!

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36. bbooooooya on November 3, 2011 7:23 AM writes...

28, "Their personal income taxes are too high."

I assume you're being ironic?

Maybe you have a point, though? We should cut personal taxes on the rich, after all, there are fewer of them and we should treat them like endangered species. Plus, what is more personally burdensome, the Koch brothers not being able to afford that new Monet for the foyer (it'll really go with the Burberry umbrella stand!) or that single mother from Detroit who has to choose between food and clothes for her kid (the kids are probably fat anyway, after all, they're American....)?

And good call on EPA! Those do-gooders have drastically decreased the number of rivers that catch fire: what a great way to keep the poor warm! Plus, with all the pollution on the Androscoggin in the 70s you could walk across it: no need to build expensive bridges.

We do live in a global economy. We should all do our part to make sure Americans live as wretchedly as those in rural (or, frankly, urban) China. They've got it right, with no EPA etc. I hear there are even a couple of days a year when you can see the sun on a clear day in the Pearl River delta (which was not the case when I was there).

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37. non organic chemist on November 3, 2011 7:27 AM writes...

"@27. Wouldn't it be cheaper, faster and more lucrative to just invest in a copy of Rosetta Stone Mandarin or Hindu?"

No, my dad is too close to retirement age and he has lived in the same place for the last 20 years and has a house, plus his old mother to look after in his free time. He needed a job at his location. I don't think he would get over the culture shock if he moved to India and all the places where pharma jobs are, are too hot for him, and have terribly polluted air. To move to a place where you have nothing and you hardly know the language, and don't have any friends is a non-starter for someone over 50 (unless it's a very well paid and lucrative position I suppose).

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38. Anonymous on November 3, 2011 7:58 AM writes...

I think the sarcasm was lost in the whole "job creators" comment. I took that as a joke.

As for LinkedIn, I got my current position through it, so I have no problems with it. Not only that, I got phone interviews with several companies through it, so it has potential to be a very powerful tool. I agree it's not the salvation for the problems the industry faces right now, but it's not worthless.

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39. Anonymous on November 3, 2011 9:46 AM writes...

I have been looking for work for a year. I am just going to cut my losses, take the money I earned and go back to school and earn a degree in an field where your job cannot be outsourced (Health, Education, etc).

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40. Young on November 3, 2011 11:44 AM writes...

Seems only Analytical and Polymer are doable if you are in a chemistry program. Several went to biotech and several went to Dow and dupont. For those Organic and Medicinal chemist, US is a dead end

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41. roger on November 3, 2011 11:52 AM writes...

@39 - Don't bother with a job in education unless you want to be an underpaid adjunct prof. There are no jobs in teaching high school. There have been nothing but layoffs.

There were 200 people competing for one intro teaching position at my local high school that recently opened up. It will go to a friend of one of the existing teachers.

So take that cash and plunk it down on a 200:1 odds horse or buy a tent and become a member of occupy wall street.


P.S- the myth that high schools want science people to teach science is just that. They'll train the appropriately well connected english PhD to teach chemistry. You're competing on the liberal arts turf, and they don't want you.

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42. Anonymous on November 3, 2011 12:05 PM writes...

@43 - My college profs could teach circles around my high school teachers, even though they've never taken an education course in their lives. They wouldn't be allowed to teach HS because of the certification BS. I think it's ridiculous that a former grad student who's taught freshman chem couldn't do the same with kids 2 years younger without taking a bunch of "education" courses.

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43. Hap on November 3, 2011 12:36 PM writes...

39: My hospital just laid off almost all the nurses in the doctors' offices I go to to replace them with cheaper assistants. They have lots of residents, so they're more available and cheaper than nurses, and that won't necessarily be true elsewhere, but it doesn't mean you can't be squeezed.

Teachers, well, where I live they're trying to nuke their unions so they can weasel out of paying their pensions without paying them more. In addition, the local districts could select teachers for quality (when they have to lay off), but since there probably isn't a good measure of quality, districts will probably select on cost (for which there is a good measure). So if you're any good, you either won't get paid or you will get paid (some) and then laid off. If you can get into administration (and can get valuable pictures of people on the school board), you might have security.

I think a trade might be a better shot - welding, plumbing, electrician work - if you can get in with the right people to get work.

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44. Anonymous on November 3, 2011 2:30 PM writes...

410 jobs gone at the Frankfurt site
http://www.transkript.de/index.php?id=11993&no_cache=1&tx_ttnews%5Btt_news%5D=13836&cHash=343b48ef0c

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45. @31,32,33 on November 3, 2011 8:40 PM writes...

A. Stop clicking on the "post" button...give the server time to upload your comment.

B. Hindu = follower of Hinduism, Hindi = one of the official languages of India. Besides, there's no need to learn Hindi. The Indians speak English (sort of) and most of the pharma/biotech growth has been in Bangalore or Hyderabad, so Rosetta Stone Kannada or Telugu, respectively, would be more appropriate.

C. 27's dad already has a lucrative immigrant-dependent business. It's about time that the world starts spending more money on the US.

Permalink to Comment

46. Jake on November 4, 2011 12:06 PM writes...

Another great article from the ministry of truth that tells us we'd all be better off with more science graduates. They assert as fact that America is suffering a drought of scientific talent. It's a crisis I'm told.

At this point you've got to ask yourself who is paying the New York Times writers to post such articles. The only thing that's obvious is more people= lower wages.

Only crusty 60 something Professors at Universities believe in the described fantasy.


www.nytimes.com/2011/11/06/education/edlife/why-science-majors-change-their-mind-its-just-so-darn-hard.html?pagewanted=3&hp

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47. Nile on November 5, 2011 6:19 AM writes...

Oh dear, we've got a Tea-Party shill 'correcting' our economic spelling. But does 'Rich' really mean 'Wealth-Creating' or 'Job-Creating' ?

I would observe that the top 1% of our population excel at hoarding and concentrating wealth; but their job-creation track record is disappointing.

Or perhaps I should correct my own spelling to 'disastrous' or to 'actively destructive'. Count up the jobs that the board of Sanofu, Merck, and Eli Lilly have created this year. Or Wall Street.

Or rather: count down.

The middle classes tend to consume the goods and services that employ people in their community, and to start small businesses that provide the job-creation on the upswing from recession. The aristocracy, by contrast, consume very little of their income, hoarding it in unproductive gold or speculative 'assets' that are mostly kept overseas, or are actively engaged in downsizing, offshoring, or lobbying for special privileges and 'corporate welfare' projects that are a net drain on the productive economy.

And, of course, some of these mismanaged assets pay for shills and propagandists, so that there can be an army of useful idiots prepared to help us with our spelling.

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48. CR on November 7, 2011 8:26 AM writes...

@Anon, #29.

You're kidding about GSK, right?

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49. Terry on November 28, 2011 4:11 AM writes...

why not cutting the wage instead to lay off scientists? 30K is bettere than being laid off ,edpecially for a middle aged scientist!the pahama industry has been traped into a weird situation!

if so, all jobs will be outsourced to China, Now i can do the same job with 1/3of salary in US, it is the reality!

Permalink to Comment

50. Ibex on January 26, 2012 10:19 PM writes...

Genzyme layoffs slated for next Tuesday. Mostly chemists.

Permalink to Comment

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