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DBL%20Hendrix%20small.png College chemistry, 1983

Derek Lowe The 2002 Model

Dbl%20new%20portrait%20B%26W.png After 10 years of blogging. . .

Derek Lowe, an Arkansan by birth, got his BA from Hendrix College and his PhD in organic chemistry from Duke before spending time in Germany on a Humboldt Fellowship on his post-doc. He's worked for several major pharmaceutical companies since 1989 on drug discovery projects against schizophrenia, Alzheimer's, diabetes, osteoporosis and other diseases. To contact Derek email him directly: derekb.lowe@gmail.com Twitter: Dereklowe

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In the Pipeline: Don't miss Derek Lowe's excellent commentary on drug discovery and the pharma industry in general at In the Pipeline

In the Pipeline

« Enthalpy and Entropy Again | Main | Lethal Injection: A Case For the FDA? »

October 26, 2010

Dapsone Prolongs Life? Well, In Nematodes It Does. . .

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Posted by Derek

Get ready for the life-extension folks to jump on this one: there's a report out in PNAS that the longtime treatment for leprosy (Hansen's disease), diaminodiphenylsulfone (DDS or dapsone), also prolongs life in the nematode C. elegans.

We seem to be talking about nematodes a lot around here recently. The authors of the current study (from Korea) got around the dosing problem by feeding DDS to bacteria, and them feeding those to the nematodes. (When you can get away with that, it seems like the most reliable way of getting drugs into the little beasts). The nematodes accumulated the compound up to about 5 mg/kilo body weight - although I have to say, a kilo of nematodes is a rather alarming thought. The treated animals showed a significantly longer lifespan, faster body movements compared to untreated controls, and a delay in accumulating the "aging pigment" lipofuscin.

Now, DDS kills bacteria by inhibiting folate synthesis, but that doesn't seem to have anything to do with lifespan extension. The authors found that one of its key targets might be pyruvate kinase - and this might be the source for the mild anemia that's sometimes seen as a side effect in human patients. Nematodes have two isoforms of the enzyme, one mostly in muscle, and the other mostly in the digestive tract. Further study (with RNAi, etc.) showed that the lifespan extension seems to be working through the former, but not the latter. But it also showed that this probably can't be responsible for the whole lifespan effect, either: mutant nematodes with that isoform deleted live longer than wild type, but treating them with DDS makes them live longer still.

The authors point out that dapsone has been used in humans for a very long time, and that there's a 5% gel that's been shown to be safe for long-term treatment (and which reaches the blood levels that you'd think would be sufficient). They finish up by saying: "We suggest that is is worthwhile to examine whether DDS is effective in enhancing longevity in humans as well." There are enough people interested in these things that I think that this will be tried out very shortly, probably starting this week, albeit in a rather uncontrolled manner. . .

Comments (9) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: Aging and Lifespan


COMMENTS

1. Anonymous on October 26, 2010 10:54 AM writes...

Maybe I can co-formulate dapsone with resveratrol and sell it to GSK for $720 million?

Permalink to Comment

2. Anonymous on October 26, 2010 12:12 PM writes...

we're on the way to obtain immortal nematodes... what a great achievement...

Permalink to Comment

3. You're Pfizered on October 26, 2010 1:07 PM writes...

This is the first step towards the nematodes taking over.

Permalink to Comment

4. John on October 26, 2010 1:44 PM writes...

Are there any formal efforts to capture the data from those high-risk self-experimentation forums?

Permalink to Comment

5. retread on October 26, 2010 2:40 PM writes...

What is it with compounds containing the S - O bond? There was a time when dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) could cure anything. People were rubbing it on their joints for arthritis and, of course, it was held to help MS (which it didn't). At least it was cheap.

Permalink to Comment

6. Botoxic on October 26, 2010 5:29 PM writes...


"Maybe I can co-formulate dapsone with resveratrol and sell it to GSK for $720 million?"

Sorry, they need the money to pay their 750 million dollar fine for selling adulterated drugs(see below).

In my day 750 mill could really buy something. Apparently it is now such small change that it is largely unworthy of comment.

Pharma is a dirty business.


http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-glaxo-20101026,0,1870424.story

Permalink to Comment

7. Botoxic on October 26, 2010 5:31 PM writes...


"Maybe I can co-formulate dapsone with resveratrol and sell it to GSK for $720 million?"

Sorry, they need the money to pay their 750 million dollar fine for selling adulterated drugs(see below).

In my day 750 mill could really buy something. Apparently it is now such small change that it is largely unworthy of comment.

Pharma is a dirty business.


http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-glaxo-20101026,0,1870424.story

Permalink to Comment

8. Anonymous on October 27, 2010 9:24 AM writes...

Maybe I could put it in a drink with acai, green tea, and caffeine and sell it as a longevity enhancing weight loss aid and cleanser and then start a multi-level marketing company. You get maximum benefit from the drink if you are on my down-line and you sell it to your annoyed friends and family!

Permalink to Comment

9. partial agonist on October 27, 2010 12:06 PM writes...

#8- That stuff only works if you are wearing my special harmonic frequency bracelet that I will sell you for a mere $19.99

Permalink to Comment

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