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DBL%20Hendrix%20small.png College chemistry, 1983

Derek Lowe The 2002 Model

Dbl%20new%20portrait%20B%26W.png After 10 years of blogging. . .

Derek Lowe, an Arkansan by birth, got his BA from Hendrix College and his PhD in organic chemistry from Duke before spending time in Germany on a Humboldt Fellowship on his post-doc. He's worked for several major pharmaceutical companies since 1989 on drug discovery projects against schizophrenia, Alzheimer's, diabetes, osteoporosis and other diseases. To contact Derek email him directly: derekb.lowe@gmail.com Twitter: Dereklowe

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In the Pipeline: Don't miss Derek Lowe's excellent commentary on drug discovery and the pharma industry in general at In the Pipeline

In the Pipeline

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November 13, 2009

Prof. Keith Fagnou

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Posted by Derek

As many readers may have heard by now, Keith Fagnou of the University of Ottawa has suddenly died from what appears to be H1N1 influenza.

I'm awaiting confirmation of that diagnosis, which is worrisome for all sorts of other reasons, but whatever the cause, this is a loss for synthetic chemisty. Prof. Fagnou had published many interesting and useful papers on catalysis of bond-forming reactions, an area that's been growing steadily in importance for years and shows no signs of faltering. We need all the smart, capable people we can get working on such things, and I'm very sorry that we've lost one. Condolences to his family, colleagues, and friends.

Comments (30) + TrackBacks (0) | Category: Current Events


COMMENTS

1. Anonymous on November 13, 2009 12:11 PM writes...

That would be the University of OttAwa.

Keith was an absolutely brilliant professor, amazing father and wonderful man. It is a sad time for the hundreds of people whose lives he has changed and the thousands of students who will now never have the honour of experiencing him, including his young children.

Swine flu or not, this is just yet another stark reminder that our time here is limited and you have to take every opportunity to tell the people you are close to that you love them. You never know when you won't get another chance.

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3. Anonymous on November 13, 2009 12:48 PM writes...

I took classes from Dr. Fagnou, and can attest to his abilities. What a remarkable person his family & friends, the University of Ottawa, Canada and the field of chemistry has lost.

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